Tag Research

Beyond silicon: researchers solve a materials mystery key to next-generation electronic devices

UW-Madison researchers have provided evidence of a hole gas coexisting with two-dimensional electron gas, a key discovery for oxide electronics.

Enter your amazing science images in the 2018 Cool Science Image Contest

To recognize the visual and exploratory value of scientific imagery, the contest offers an opportunity to show off compelling — and often artistic — science images made by students, staff or faculty.

From fungi to humans, ‘smart valves’ assist communication within, between cells

Trees. Fungi. Monkeys. Fish. Your aunt and uncle. Without fusion pores built of SNARE proteins, they can't exist.

Stellar magnetism: What’s behind the most brilliant lights in the sky?

"The best picture yet of magnetic reconnection in space” offer insight into the role of magnetic reconnection in celestial explosions, eruptions and extraordinary emissions of energy.

Urban foxes and coyotes learn to set aside their differences and coexist

Diverging from centuries of established behavioral norms, red fox and coyote have gone against their wild instincts and learned to coexist in the urban environment of Madison and the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus.

An Achilles heel discovered in viruses could fuel new antiviral approaches

Scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have discovered a promising new target to fight a class of viruses responsible for health threats such as Zika, polio, dengue, SARS and hepatitis C.

Cartoons communicate issues in bioethics research

The comics span topics from gene editing to clinical trials and statistical manipulations. Many are ultimately about how truthfully research is communicated — to patients, to the public, even to other scientists.

Cancer patients who tell their life story find more peace, less depression

A new study finds that delivering an edited life and cancer story elicited by a phone conversation measurably enhances the sense of peace in the face of looming death.

Bringing cheap and accurate tuberculosis tests to Africa

Researchers are developing a "robust, simple and inexpensive way to increase the sensitivity of an existing TB test" by integrating a step very similar to a pregnancy test.

Maria Cancian named Galbraith Fellow for work on child welfare

Cancian and her research have shaped national research agendas and discourse on child support policy, poverty policy and child welfare policy, and generated more than $50 million in grants to the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Report: Focusing on advanced energy sensors and controls could mean 44,000 jobs for Wisconsin

With targeted investments and forward-looking policies, Wisconsin could capitalize on its strengths in sensors and controls for the advanced energy industry to drive economic growth and support over 44,000 jobs annually.

As influenza looms, Madison firm advances human trials of revolutionary vaccine

One of the most promising universal flu vaccines is being developed by FluGen, a spinoff from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Next up is an experimental trial.

Radar adds technological twist to age-old cranberry counting process

UW electrical and computer engineers, acting on an idea from a Wisconsin cranberry grower, have developed a device to make a laborious, time-consuming process more efficient.

Study advances gene therapy for glaucoma

A new study shows an improved tactic for delivering new genes into the eye's drain, called the trabecular meshwork, offering a promising treatment for glaucoma.

Invasive worms spreading in Arboretum forests, limited effects so far

Despite Asian jumping worms’ known appetite for leaf litter and tendency to change soil nutrients, researchers found limited evidence of changes to vegetation in areas where the worms have invaded the UW–Madison Arboretum.

Lethal management of wolves in one place may make things worse nearby

Farms that had a wolf killed experienced a 27 percent decrease in risk of another attack, but it was offset by a 22 percent increase at a number of farms in the same township.

Scouting the eagles: Evidence that protecting nests aids reproduction

Reproduction among bald eagles in a remote national park in Minnesota was aided when their nests were protected from human disturbance, according to a new study.

Wisconsin corridor turns testbed for connected vehicle technology

A team of UW–Madison researchers and Madison traffic engineers are establishing a testbed for a connected vehicle corridor on Madison's Park Street, to explore the future of transportation technology.

New stem cell method sheds light on a telltale sign of heart disease

A regenerative biology team at the Morgridge Institute for Research led by Dave Vereide unexpectedly unearthed a powerful new model for studying a hallmark of vascular disease.