Tag Research

Long-term cancer survivor beats odds, prompts study

The unusual case of Margaret “Peg” Geisler has inspired an international search for “extreme survivors” of metastatic breast cancer. “They never teach you about patients like Peg in medical school," says UW Health oncologist Mark Burkard.

Spiders and scorpions have co-opted leg genes to build their heads

New research shows that the common house spider and its arachnid relatives have dispensed with a gene involved in creating segmented heads, instead recycling leg genes to accomplish the task.

Grant to fund study of entrepreneurial ecosystems at universities

The Wisconsin School of Business has received funding to study how to improve university entrepreneurial ecosystems to drive economic growth.

When communicating with color, balance can be a path to accuracy

UW-Madison Researchers found that the best colors to use for waste bins are shades of white for paper, red for plastic, pale blue-green for glass, dark grey for metal, dark green for compost, and black for trash.

Study destroys myth that motorcycle helmets break necks

The motorcycle crash victims who did not wear helmets had twice as many injuries to the cervical spine, commonly known as the neck, the study says.

Kids with easy access to firearms are more likely to be depressed

Easy access to a gun at home is bad for a child’s mental health, particularly for girls, according to a new examination of a study of American schoolchildren from the 1990s.

UW study: Excessive use of menthol cough drops could actually increase coughs

A new study of more than 500 patients has shown that too many cough drops - especially those containing menthol - may actually make coughs more severe.

They grin, you bear it. Research reveals physical impact of a smile.

New research shows that smiles meant to convey dominance trigger a physical spike in stress hormones in their targets, while smiles intended as a reward appear to physically buffer recipients against stress.

Girls and women not a “silver bullet” for ending poverty

Researcher Kathryn Moeller says such initiatives transfer the responsibility for change onto girls and women, and away from governments, corporations and global governance institutions whose actions have often led to the unequal distribution of resources, poor labor conditions and other structural inequities.

Forecasting antibiotic resistance with a ‘weather map’ of local data

To help physicians choose the best antibiotic first, researchers in the School of Pharmacy and the State Cartographer's Office are drawing inspiration from the weather.

To sleep, perchance to forget

The debate in sleep science has gone on for a generation. People and other animals sicken and die if they are deprived of sleep, but why is sleep so essential?

New approaches in neuroscience show it’s not all in your head

“How we experience the world affects us in more ways than we previously thought,” says Richard Davidson, a professor of psychology and psychiatry at UW–Madison and director of the Center for Healthy Minds.