UW In The News

  • Climate change impact: Study finds mental health issues will increase

    The Atlanta Journal Constitution | October 18, 2018

    Quoted: “The most important point of this [new] study is that climate change, indeed, is affecting mental health, and certain populations (women and the poor) are disproportionally impacted,” Jonathan Patz, a professor and director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who was not involved with the study, told CNN.

  • Why we’re so fixated on bringing back the woolly mammoth

    Mother Nature Network | October 18, 2018

    Quoted: “De-extinction just provides the ultimate ’out’,” Stanley Temple, a wildlife biologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, told BBC Newsbeat in 2015. “If you can always bring the species back later, it undermines the urgency about preventing extinctions.”

  • In the 2018 midterms, many more people are running — and far more seats are contested — than we’ve seen for a generation.

    The Washington Post | October 17, 2018

    The 2018 elections differ from previous midterms in so many ways. And one, at least, is a good sign for democracy: Many more people are running for office this time around.

    Barry Burden (@bcburden) is professor of political science and director of the Elections Research Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  • Report Calls For Capturing Carbon To Combat Climate Change. How Would That Work?

    Here & Now | October 16, 2018

    Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Gregory Nemet, professor of public affairs and environmental studies at the La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin Madison.

  • UW-Madison Works With Brewing Company on Wild Lager

    US News and World Report | October 15, 2018

    A Wisconsin brewing company and the University of Wisconsin-Madison are working together to create the first wild lager brewed in North America, according to a company official.

  • Democrats Want to Beat Scott Walker. But the Wisconsin Economy Is a Hurdle.

    The New York Times | October 15, 2018

    “It’s hard to argue we need a change economically as people are doing well,” said Noah Williams, director of the Center for Research on the Wisconsin Economy at the University of Wisconsin — Madison.

  • Go Big Read author Dan Egan to speak at UW

    WISC-TV 3 | October 12, 2018

    Dan Egan, author of “The Death and Life of the Great Lakes” will speak at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Oct. 16.

  • Is Scott Walker’s winning streak nearing an end? Wisconsin race poses challenge

    Fox News | October 12, 2018

    Quoted: “Unemployment is lower than the national average, the tax cuts have gone over well, but, he has benefitted in the past when he has had President Obama to run against as a foil,” Barry Burden, a political science professor at the University of Wisconsin, told Fox News.

  • Beautiful science of small world showcased in video competition

    Chemistry World | October 12, 2018

    Elizabeth Haynes and Jiaye He from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, US, shot the winning video of the developing zebrafish over 16 hours using selective plane illumination microscopy.

  • President’s Oak Lives on at UW-Madison

    WKOW-TV 27 | October 11, 2018

    UW-Madison’s oldest tree, cut down three years ago, is getting another lease on life. In 2015, UW-Madison had to say goodbye to the President’s Oak. It was the oldest tree on campus, estimated to be around 300 years old.

  • Plan Would Pay Hunters To Shoot More Deer With CWD

    Wisconsin Public Radio | October 10, 2018

    Quoted: But some are skeptical of the idea of trying to pay hunters to reduce the prevalence of CWD would work. Mike Samuel is an emeritus professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He said the first problem with Foy’s plan is a lack of data.

  • Spoiler alert: How to read those ‘sell by’ and ‘use by’ labels on food

    The Washington Post | October 9, 2018

    “Freezing is an excellent way to halt the aging process and extend the life of foods that might otherwise go bad or get thrown away,” says Tyler Lark, a food-waste researcher at Gibbs Land Use and Environment Lab at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Frozen foods won’t go bad, because bacteria and other pathogens can’t grow in frozen temperatures.

  • All In Your Mind: How mindful and meditative practices are gaining mainstream momentum

    CBC | October 9, 2018

    Quoted: Cortland Dahl, a research scientist for the Centre for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, says there is a scientific reason that meditation helped Ravindran. “As a skill, we can actually train the mind and train ourselves to intentionally notice the positives in any particular interaction or moment,” Dahl said.

  • As global temperatures rise, so will mental health issues, study says

    CNN | October 9, 2018

    Quoted: Dr. Jonathan Patz, a professor and director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said the study is consistent with recent work by other scientists, including his own recent research on heat waves and hospital admissions in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, over a 17-year period, he said. Patz and his co-authors found that high temperatures impacted admissions for self-harm, including attempted suicide.

  • An Ancient Ant-Bacteria Partnership to Protect Fungus

    The New York Times | October 8, 2018

    “If the fungus dies, the ants die,” said Cameron Currie, a microbial ecologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who studies the fungal-farming ants and their mutually beneficial relationships with other species.

  • Bear hibernation is a superpower, but it comes with a cost

    Mashable | October 8, 2018

    Quoted: “I always call this the magical time of year,” Hannah Carey, who researches the physiology of hibernating animals at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s School of Veterinary Medicine, said in an interview.

  • COLD WEATHER WARNING: Freezing temperatures to be more common ‘extreme events’ coming

    Express.Co.Uk | October 8, 2018

    Scientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and the University of Wisconsin-Madison examined precipitation data from 17 stations in the US and found dry or wet spells lasting four or more days occurred more frequently in recent decades.

  • Memorial Union celebrates 90th anniversary

    WISC-TV 3 | October 5, 2018

    The Memorial Union, a Madison staple since 1928, first opened its doors exactly 90 years ago Friday.

  • The college try: How the Wisconsin Idea reached one of the poorest regions in Sierra Leone

    Isthmus | October 4, 2018

    Noted: The main force behind the University of Koinadugu is a man who could have used it decades ago. Alhaji N’Jai managed to go to college in Michigan only after escaping his country’s civil war. Eventually he joined a post-doctorate program at UW-Madison. It was here, on the second floor of the Memorial Union, that he saw a display about the famed Wisconsin Idea.

    “Straight then I said to myself ‘this is actually what we need in Sierra Leone,’” N’Jai says.

  • UW-Madison in top 50 (again) among world’s best universities

    Wisconsin State Journal | September 28, 2018

    UW-Madison is ranked among the top 50 universities in the world once again, and is in the top 25 of U.S. universities, according to rankings released Wednesday.

  • Climate change: National parks at greater risk, study says

    The Washington Post | September 26, 2018

    A new study published Monday has warned that climate change has adversely and uniquely affected many of the 417 national parks spread across the United States and its territories, according to scientists from the University of California at Berkeley and University of Wisconsin.

  • Climate Change Science: National Parks Affected Worse Than the Rest of US

    Inverse | September 26, 2018

    In the study, published in Environmental Research Letters, scientists from the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Wisconsin-Madison show that temperatures in the national parks increased by 33.8 °F from 1895 to 2010.

  • Does microwaving food cause nutrient loss?

    CNN | September 26, 2018

    Quoted: Any kind of cooking method will result in some nutrient losses, so a better way to look at the issue is to what degree nutrients are depleted, explained Scott A. Rankin, professor and chair of the Department of Food Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. And “typical microwave heating results in very minimal loss of valuable nutrients in food,” Rankin said.

  • An Artist Who Champions and Channels Female Voices

    The New York Times | September 25, 2018

    Ms. Coyne’s references to writers will be the focus of an exhibition in 2021 at the Chazen Museum of Art at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Amy Gilman, director of the Chazen, finds the sculptures “evocative in the way that great literature stays with you,” she said. “Petah’s work exposes private things without being explicit, these deep wells of memory and meaning and relationship.”

  • Trump’s Irresponsible Denial of Puerto Rico’s Hurricane Deaths

    Scientific American | September 25, 2018

    President Trump provoked outrage on Twitter and in the media in mid-September with his tweets that denied the death toll in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria in 2017 and blamed Democrats for artificially elevating it.

  • An Artist Who Champions and Channels Female Voices

    New York Times | September 25, 2018

    Noted: Ms. Coyne’s references to writers will be the focus of an exhibition in 2021 at the Chazen Museum of Art at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Amy Gilman, director of the Chazen, finds the sculptures “evocative in the way that great literature stays with you,” she said. “Petah’s work exposes private things without being explicit, these deep wells of memory and meaning and relationship.”

  • UW freshman class is largest ever; total enrollment tops 44,000

    Wisconsin State Journal | September 25, 2018

    UW-Madison welcomed 6,862 freshmen, for a class of 2022 that’s 3.8 percent bigger than last year’s class of 6,610.

  • Study Eyes Climate Change Impact on National Parks

    NBC Southern California | September 25, 2018

    Emissions from cars, power plants and deforestation are leading to the increase in wildfire burn zones, the melting of glaciers as well as shifting vegetation, according to the study, which was conducted by University of California, Berkeley and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  • National Parks Warming Twice as Fast as Rest of Country, Study Says

    The Weather Channel | September 25, 2018

    Temperatures have risen 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit in the 417 national parks between 1895 and 2010, twice the rate of anywhere else in the country, according to the study by the University of California Berkeley and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  • Weather and Climate: What’s the Difference?

    How Stuff Works | September 21, 2018

    Quoted: “Weather is the day-to-day variation in meteorological conditions,” Jonathan Martin, a professor of atmospheric and oceanic sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, explains. “Climate is the aggregate of weather events, resulting in a long-term average.”

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