Tag Anthropology

Cellphones causing horns on millennials? Not so fast

June 21, 2019

Anthropology Professor John Hawks says the research just doesn't back up the claim behind the viral story: that a higher proportion of young men are growing horns, apparently because of cell phone use.

Pandey, Wendland land American Council of Learned Societies Fellowships

May 2, 2019

Both plan to use their fellowships to work on writing books. Nandini Pandey's will be called "Diversity and Difference in Imperial Rome," and Claire Wendland's is "Partial Stories: Maternal Death in a Changing African World."

Ancient poop helps show climate change contributed to fall of Cahokia

February 25, 2019

A study provides a direct link between changes in Cahokia’s population size as measured through a unique fecal record and environmental data showing evidence of drought and flood.

‘Origins’ scientists to take your questions Thursday during Reddit AMA

May 1, 2018

Ever wondered what it’s like to unearth a long-buried human ancestor? Or to peer into the night sky to discover the mysteries of galaxy evolution? Find out Thursday.

In ‘Origins,’ UW–Madison and South African scientists tackle mysteries of our shared beginnings

April 23, 2018

The quest to understand our beginnings — of our universe, of life on Earth, of our species — inspires people all over the world. At UW–Madison, researchers have forged partnerships with colleagues in South Africa and are uncovering answers and opening new scientific frontiers.

Violence a matter of scale, not quantity, researchers show

December 11, 2017

New research shows that the size of a society’s population is what drives the size of its “war group,” or number of people of fighting age who defend it.

South African cave yields yet more fossils of a newfound relative

May 9, 2017

The discovery of the new Homo naledi fossils, representing the remains of at least three juvenile and adult specimens, includes a “wonderfully complete skull,” says UW–Madison anthropologist John Hawks.

Yellow fever killing thousands of monkeys in Brazil

March 21, 2017

In a vulnerable forest in southeastern Brazil, where the air was once thick with the guttural chatter of brown howler monkeys, there now exists silence. Yellow fever, a virus carried by mosquitoes and endemic to Africa and South America, has killed thousands of monkeys since late 2016.

Karen Strier is elected president of International Primatological Society

October 10, 2016

For the first time in its 52-year history, the International Primatological Society has elected a University of Wisconsin–Madison scientist as its president: Karen Strier, Vilas Research Professor and Irven DeVore Professor of Anthropology.

Old technology provides modern lessons to archaeology students

July 28, 2016

Students in anthropology Professor Mark Kenoyer's Ancient Technology and Invention course were working recently under a beating hot sun at the outdoor UW–Madison Experimental Archaeology Lab near Picnic Point.

Explorations at Aztalan yield enthusiasm and excitement for visitors, students

June 15, 2016

Excavations are underway to better understand the daily lives of the ancient peoples who called Aztalan home a millennium ago.

UW-Madison graduate named Gates Cambridge Scholar

February 15, 2016

Joanna Lawrence received her bachelor’s degree in anthropology from UW–Madison and completed her master’s degree in archaeology at Cambridge last year.