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Tag Climate change

Long-term picture offers little solace on climate change

February 8, 2016

A new study finds that the catastrophic impact of another three centuries of carbon pollution will persist millennia after the carbon dioxide releases cease.

Between soil and snow

January 5, 2016

Professors Jonathan Pauli and Benjamin Zuckerberg explain the subnivium — habitat between the ground and winter snow cover that is being affected by climate change.

Bird habitat changing quickly as climate change proceeds

December 22, 2015

The climatic conditions needed by 285 species of land birds in the United States have moved rapidly between 1950 and 2011 as a result of…

Holloway named inaugural fellow of AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute

September 9, 2015

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has named Tracey Holloway, a professor of environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, an inaugural Public Engagement Fellow of the Alan I. Leshner Leadership Institute for Public Engagement with Science for 2016-17.

Hurricane expert Kerry Emanuel to speak at UW–Madison

March 17, 2015

Kerry Emanuel, a leading authority on hurricanes and climate, will deliver the 6th Len Robock Annual Lecture March 24 at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Muddy forests, shorter winters present challenges for loggers

December 22, 2014

Stable, frozen ground has long been recognized a logger’s friend, capable of supporting equipment and trucks in marshy or soggy forests. Now, a comprehensive look at weather from 1948 onward shows that the logger’s friend is melting. The study, published in the current issue of the Journal of Environmental Management, finds that the period of frozen ground has declined by an average of two or three weeks since 1948.

Study models the past to understand the future of strengthening El Niño

November 26, 2014

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond. A team of researchers led by the University of Wisconsin’s Zhengyu Liu will publish the latest findings in this quest Nov. 27 in Nature.