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Tag Chemistry

Chemist Randall Goldsmith named a Schmidt Science Polymath

July 5, 2022

The UW–Madison professor's multidisciplinary approach to studying chemical and biophysical systems earned a $2.5 million award from the philanthropic organization founded by the former CEO of Google.

Chemical reaction: ‘a huge upgrade’

April 19, 2022

The recently opened addition to the Chemistry Building on University Avenue is a nine-story tower housing lecture halls, an information commons, offices, teaching laboratories, and group write-up spaces for undergraduate teaching labs. 

Flexibility may be the key to potent peptides for treating diabetes

December 22, 2021

New research suggests that the peptides — short chunks of protein — used to treat Type 2 diabetes may be more effective if they’re able to flexibly move back and forth between different shapes.

Ocean life helps produce clouds, but existing clouds keep new ones at bay

October 11, 2021

New research findings from the UW, NOAA and others may change the way scientists predict how cloud formation responds to changes in the oceans.

Campus sustainability initiatives have their day in the sun

August 13, 2021

On August 12, leaders from the Wisconsin Departments of Administration (DOA), Financial Institutions (DFI), and Safety & Professional Services (DSPS) toured several campus facilities to learn more about the ways UW strives to create solutions that address some of today’s biggest sustainability challenges.

NSF award to establish network for advanced NMR across three institutions

June 16, 2021

UW–Madison will join a first-of-its-kind collaborative network for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which researchers use to probe large biological molecules like proteins and RNA.

Scientists develop better way to block viruses that cause childhood respiratory infections

May 10, 2021

While the approach hasn’t yet been tested in humans and researchers must further refine and test the system, it does provide a new strategy for potentially preventing or treating these common infections.

New method targets disease-causing proteins for destruction

March 18, 2021

The technology, developed by UW–Madison Professor Weiping Tang and colleagues in the School of Pharmacy, could produce entirely new kinds of drugs.

Measuring the pancreas’s protein landscape assists diabetes and cancer research

February 18, 2021

New research aims to measure the pancreas’s entire suite of proteins. Ultimately, that data will advance research on pancreatic diseases like pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, or diabetes.

COVID questions: Influenza comparison, selling home precautions

October 29, 2020

What's the difference between COVID-19 and influenza? What precautions should I take after potential buyers tour my home?

American Physical Society bestows top honors on two UW scientists

October 20, 2020

Physics professor Vernon Barger won the J.J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics, and chemistry professor Martin Zanni was the recipient of the Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy & Dynamics.

UW biochemist Scott Coyle awarded 2020 Packard Fellowship

October 15, 2020

Coyle's research could have far-reaching applications, from expanding the scope of cell-based therapies to fight disease to developing micro-technologies for bioremediation of damaged environmental sites.

Pediatric cancers share stalled gene-managing enzyme

October 15, 2020

A wildly out-of-place protein leads to haywire cells in a particularly troublesome type of rare early childhood cancer, according to University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers.

New national imaging center has potential to transform medicine

September 21, 2020

The National Institutes of Health will provide $22.7 million over six years to create a national research and training hub at UW–Madison that will give scientists across the country access to this game-changing technology.

Nanoparticle system captures heart-disease biomarker from blood for in-depth analysis

August 6, 2020

An effective test of cTnI variations could one day provide doctors with a better ability to diagnose heart disease, the leading cause of death in the U.S.