Tag Biology

Finding a weak link in the frightful parasite Schistosoma

More than 250 million people, mostly in Africa and Asia, have schistosomiasis, which kills an estimated 280,000 each year. “We don’t get that many aha! moments in our lives as scientists,” says a researcher. “This was one of them.”

High-powered microscopy coming to a scientist near you

A portable light-sheet microscope that shrinks to the weight and dimensions of a packed suitcase can be mailed to a lab anywhere in the world, configured remotely by Morgridge Institute for Research engineers to run experiments.

Searching the sea, and bacterial battles, for new antibiotics

Researchers in pharmacy and bacteriology say their discovery would not have been possible without a cross-college collaboration going back nearly a decade.

UW-Madison biomanufacturer offers essential gene-transfer capacity

A UW–Madison lab that makes proteins, antibodies and viruses has begun manufacturing a virus critical to experimental treatments for many genetic conditions.

Spiders and scorpions have co-opted leg genes to build their heads

New research shows that the common house spider and its arachnid relatives have dispensed with a gene involved in creating segmented heads, instead recycling leg genes to accomplish the task.

Green spaces in cities help control floods, store carbon

A new study finds that urban green spaces like backyards, city parks and golf courses contribute substantially to the ecological fabric of our cities — and the wider landscape — and should be included in ecological data.

From fungi to humans, ‘smart valves’ assist communication within, between cells

Trees. Fungi. Monkeys. Fish. Your aunt and uncle. Without fusion pores built of SNARE proteins, they can't exist.

Monkeys infected by mosquito bites further Zika virus research

Monkeys who catch Zika virus through bites from infected mosquitoes develop infections that look like human Zika cases, and may help researchers understand the many ways Zika can be transmitted.

Fish respond to predator attack by doubling growth rate

“In water, the surviving perch grow twice as fast, because they are smelling something that signals the presence of predators,” says researcher Terence Barry.

New Faculty Focus: Hilary Dugan

New Integrative Biology Professor Hilary Dugan once worked as a research assistant in the Canadian Arctic and fell in love with fieldwork and studying global change. At some point, her interests narrowed to water, and eventually lakes.

Citizen scientists scour Madison area for invasive jumping worms

The worms churn through leaf litter at a faster clip than their more sluggish earthworm cousins, potentially processing nutrients faster than plants are able to use them and disrupting ecosystems.

Study reveals interplay of an African bat, a parasite and a virus

The role of bat parasites in maintaining chains of viral infection is little studied, and the new study serves up some intriguing insights into how viruses co-opt parasites to help do the dirty work of disease transmission.