Stories indexed under: Biology

Total: 32   RSSRSS feed

  • Photo: Robert Hamers Sustainable nanotechnology center lands new $20 million contract Aug. 31, 2015 The Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology, a multi-institutional research center based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has inked a new contract with the National Science Foundation (NSF) that will provide nearly $20 million in support over the next five years.
  • Photo: Aerial shot of UW-Madison campus UW 2020: New VCRGE program to support early stage research July 28, 2015 In an effort to create a dynamic new funding mechanism for bold research ideas, ideas with potential to drive significant discoveries, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education (VCRGE), with support from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), is teeing up a new program to seed potentially groundbreaking research.
  • Photo: Sam Gellman Chemical dial controls attraction between water-repelling molecules Jan. 14, 2015 Abbott, Gellman and a group of University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have provided new insights on hydrophobic interactions within complex systems. In a study published today in the journal Nature, the researchers show how the nearby presence of polar (water-attracted, or hydrophilic) substances can change the way the nonpolar hydrophobic groups want to stick to each other.
  • Photo: Swimming leatherback turtle Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals Oct. 29, 2014 For the first time, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Florida Atlantic University (FAU), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.
  • Photo: Birds gather at bird feeder Climate change alters cast of winter birds Oct. 16, 2014 Over the past two decades, the resident communities of birds that attend eastern North America’s backyard bird feeders in winter have quietly been remade, most likely as a result of a warming climate. Writing this week in the journal Global Change Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison wildlife biologists Benjamin Zuckerberg and Karine Princé document that once rare wintering bird species are now commonplace in the American Northeast.
  • Ray Owen In memoriam: Ray D. Owen discovered immune tolerance, paved the way for organ transplantation Sept. 26, 2014 Ray D. Owen, who died on Sept. 21 in Pasadena, California, at the age of 98, discovered the phenomenon of immune tolerance, fueling a revolution in immunology and laying the foundation for the successful transplantation of human organs. Owen left Madison in 1947 to join the faculty at Caltech, where he remained for the rest of his long, distinguished career. His later work included studies on human antibodies, blood-group antigens, and the evolution of immune systems.
  • Photo: Brandon Barton Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance Sept. 19, 2014 Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air - and the soybeans - were still?
  • Soybean plants A touching story: The ancient conversation between plants, fungi and bacteria Aug. 27, 2014 The mechanical force that a single fungal cell or bacterial colony exerts on a plant cell may seem vanishingly small, but it plays a heavy role in setting up some of the most fundamental symbiotic relationships in biology. In fact, it may not be too much of a stretch to say that plants may have never moved onto land without the ability to respond to the touch of beneficial fungi, according to a new study led by Jean-Michel Ané, a professor of agronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Photo: students with paddleboard Pre-college programs open doors for leadership roles Aug. 4, 2014 Whether their connections were social, academic or professional, former participants in UW-Madison's summer residence programs through University Housing say the camps were essential for creating future opportunities.
  • Janet Hyde First in the nation: UW-Madison establishes post-doc in feminist biology April 17, 2014 Feminist biology - which attempts to uncover and reverse gender bias in biology - will be the focus of a new, endowed fellowship in the Department of Gender and Women's Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Sea turtle Baby sea turtles spend ‘lost years’ in warm blankets of seaweed March 4, 2014 Nosing their way out of eggs buried in sandy beaches from Florida’s east coast north into the Carolinas, baby loggerhead sea turtles race to the water as fast as their flippers will carry them and begin a swim frenzy to clear the predator-rich shore.
  • Photo: three-toed sloth in tree What’s with sloths’ dangerous bathroom breaks? Maybe hunger Jan. 24, 2014 For the three-toed sloth, a trip to the restroom is no rest at all. It's a long, slow descent into mortal danger from the safety of home among the upper branches of the forest.
  • Photo: chimp with tick in nose UW scientist sniffs out possible new tick species Oct. 1, 2013 In June 2012, Tony Goldberg returned from one of his frequent trips to Kibale National Park, an almost 500-square-mile forest in western Uganda where he studies how infectious diseases spread and evolve in the wild. But he didn’t return alone.
  • Photo: divers preparing for plant survey In whole-lake experiment, have invasive crayfish met their match? Sept. 6, 2013 Four years ago, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers wrapped up a multi-year effort to dramatically reduce the population of a destructive invasive species in a northern Wisconsin lake.
  • In whole-lake experiment, have invasive crayfish met their match? Sept. 6, 2013 Four years ago, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers wrapped up a multi-year effort to dramatically reduce the population of a destructive invasive species in a northern Wisconsin lake.
  • Ned Kalin - revealing disorders of the brain June 10, 2013 Dr. Ned Kalin, chair of the Department of Psychiatry, is an accomplished biological psychiatrist whose research focuses on anxiety. Through imaging studies and understanding the genetic and environmental components of mental illness, his lab is working toward discoveries that can form the basis of early interventions to treat children who are at risk of developing long-term anxiety and related psychiatric disorders.
  • Symposium will focus on developmental biology May 23, 2013 When former University of Wisconsin-Madison genetics professor Oliver Smithies won the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, he dedicated a portion of his prize money to start a symposium to bring top biologists to campus as a resource for students, faculty, and staff.
  • Thinking ‘big’ may not be best approach to saving large-river fish May 22, 2013 Large-river specialist fishes - from giant species like paddlefish and blue catfish, to tiny crystal darters and silver chub - are in danger, but researchers say there is greater hope to save them if major tributaries identified in a University of Wisconsin-Madison study become a focus of conservation efforts.
  • Decline in snow cover spells trouble for many plants, animals May 6, 2013 For plants and animals forced to tough out harsh winter weather, the coverlet of snow that blankets the north country is a refuge, a stable beneath-the-snow habitat that gives essential respite from biting winds and subzero temperatures.
  • New living, learning community to welcome biology students April 24, 2013 To help bio newbies get off to the right start, as many as 130 students will begin 2014 in BioHouse, the university’s 10th residential learning community.