Tag Sociology

Record-low fertility rates linked to decline in stable manufacturing jobs

June 18, 2019

New UW–Madison research identifies a link between the long-term decline in manufacturing jobs — accelerated during the Great Recession — and reduced fertility rates.

UW-Madison mourns renowned sociologist Erik Olin Wright

January 25, 2019

Wright was a giant in the field of contemporary Marxian sociology. He wrote 15 books and more than 100 research papers, many focused on class and capitalism.

Study finds Wisconsin’s African American poverty rate three to four times higher than white poverty rate

September 28, 2018

A new report from UW–Madison's Institute for Research on Poverty finds large disparities in poverty between white residents and those of color, especially African Americans.

Bucking trends, these Wisconsin communities attract, keep young adults. How?

July 9, 2018

UW-Madison researchers took a look at how Omro, De Pere and some other towns have been able to grow. Factors include good schools, affordable housing and access to a larger city via an interstate highway.

Study shows undocumented immigration doesn’t increase violent crime

April 23, 2018

The impact of undocumented immigration — especially on public safety — remains a contentious topic of discussion in the United States, but "the conversations are occurring in a vacuum of data,” says researcher Michael Light.

UW student with political ambitions receives prestigious Truman Scholarship

April 13, 2018

UW-Madison senior Jordan Madden will be able to build upon his mission of helping others as the recipient of a 2018 Truman Scholarship.

Kids with easy access to firearms are more likely to be depressed

March 9, 2018

Easy access to a gun at home is bad for a child’s mental health, particularly for girls, according to a new examination of a study of American schoolchildren from the 1990s.

As Wisconsin tries to lure young adults, how do certain communities succeed?

January 22, 2018

A study of places that are attracting more residents found that it was always about proximity to cities, and about housing, schools and outdoor amenities.

Course explores new field at intersection of genomics and society

August 18, 2017

Jason Fletcher is researching how public policy intersects with genetic data, what our genes can predict about how society functions, and how we should use this data responsibly — an area of study dubbed "social genomics."

Undocumented immigration doesn’t worsen drug, alcohol problems in U.S., study indicates

July 31, 2017

An increase in the proportion of the population that is undocumented is associated with fewer drug arrests, drunken driving arrests and drug overdoses.

UW-Madison alumnus, Go Big Read author at head of class

November 2, 2016

As a graduate student, Matthew Desmond spent countless hours in class at the Sewell Social Sciences Building. On Wednesday morning, he was at the front of the class, leading a discussion about his book “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.”

Unparalleled pomp attends professor’s Finnish fete

July 5, 2016

Sociology Professor Douglas Maynard has received many honors in his career but until recently, they never came with a sword.

Microbiome meets big social science: What’s the potential?

October 15, 2013

Over the last decade or so, biologists have mustered an ever-growing appreciation for the essential role of microbial communities in a diversity of environments.

Microbiome and human health workshop

August 29, 2013

The opportunity to couple this emerging field and a traditional strength of UW–Madison — large longitudinal studies such as the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study; the Beaver Dam Eye Study; MIDUS, Midlife in the United States; and the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort — will be explored in a small, one-day workshop to be sponsored by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging and the Center for Demography and Ecology.