Tag Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies

Elders-in-Residence Program will bring Native community leaders to campus for mentoring, support

The initiative will seek to improve the experience of American Indian and Alaskan Native students by hosting Native elders on campus for extended visits and educational exchanges.

A warming climate means profound changes for U.S. National Parks

The analysis of all 417 of America’s national parks, conducted by UW–Madison’s Center for Climatic Research, found that average temperatures increased at twice the rate as the rest of the nation over the past century.

Ancient farmers spared us from glaciers but profoundly changed Earth’s climate

Ancient farming practices led to a rise in the atmospheric emission of the heat-trapping gases carbon dioxide and methane – a rise that has continued since, unlike the trend at any other time in Earth’s geologic history, according to new UW–Madison research.

In a warming world, could air conditioning make things worse?

A team of UW–Madison researchers forecasts as many as a thousand additional deaths annually in the Eastern United States alone due to elevated levels of air pollution driven by the increased use of fossil fuels to cool the buildings where humans live and work.

Invasive worms spreading in Arboretum forests, limited effects so far

Despite Asian jumping worms’ known appetite for leaf litter and tendency to change soil nutrients, researchers found limited evidence of changes to vegetation in areas where the worms have invaded the UW–Madison Arboretum.

Lethal management of wolves in one place may make things worse nearby

Farms that had a wolf killed experienced a 27 percent decrease in risk of another attack, but it was offset by a 22 percent increase at a number of farms in the same township.

Mapping cropland: UW–Madison plays critical role in worldwide map

A UW–Madison researcher was part of a global collaboration has just released a satellite-based map of world croplands that “found” 625 million to 875 million acres that were not known to national agricultural authorities.

Degree program uses satellite, drone technologies to solve environmental problems

Students will learn skills that can be applied to conducting wildlife surveys, mapping floodwaters, monitoring environmental conditions, and many other applications.

Study measures air pollution increase attributable to air conditioning

The study shows the electricity production associated with air conditioning causes emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxide to increase by hundreds to thousands of metric tons.

Two from UW–Madison among 2017 Carnegie Fellows

Gregg Mitman and Greg Nemet are among 35 distinguished scholars, journalists and authors chosen this year. The fellows program boosts scholars in the social sciences and humanities as they research challenges to democracy and international order.

Three deans reappointed after 5-year reviews

Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies Director Paul Robbins, School of Medicine and Public Health Dean Robert Golden, and School of Human Ecology Dean Soyeon Shim have agreed to accept reappointment to their positions.

Review process begins for 2 deans, 1 director

This fall, reviews are underway for Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies Director Paul Robbins; School of Human Ecology Dean Soyeon Shim; and School of Medicine and Public Health Dean Robert Golden.

Holloway named inaugural fellow of AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has named Tracey Holloway, a professor of environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, an inaugural Public Engagement Fellow of the Alan I. Leshner Leadership Institute for Public Engagement with Science for 2016-17.

Steven Rinella of TV’s ‘MeatEater’ to make UW appearance

Steven Rinella, award-winning author and host of the hit TV show “MeatEater,” will give a talk the evening of April 14 to discuss his outdoor adventures and his life as a modern day hunter-gatherer.