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Tag Health care

Student veterans find another service opportunity in social work

November 11, 2014

Social work is an increasingly popular choice for veterans returning to graduate school. Just under 20 percent of graduate students receiving veteran’s benefits at UW–Madison are pursuing a master’s degree in social work, according to data from the UW–Madison Graduate School, while only 4 percent of graduate students overall are enrolled in the MSW Program.

Alumnus finds passion for patient advocacy after accident

September 23, 2014

When Jeff Mahlum suffered a spinal cord injury during a diving accident in 2011 that left him paralyzed from the chest down, he had the unfortunate opportunity to learn how confusing and daunting the health care system can be. Having graduated with a major in biology from the UW in 2013, Mahlum decided to use the gap year between undergraduate and medical school to learn more about how he could understand the needs of his future patients. Mahlum, who’s now enrolled at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, discovered patient advocacy and the Center for Patient Partnerships.

Medical procedure for humans helps heal leaky show cow

July 9, 2014

When a dairy cow leaks milk, it can lead to variety of problems, from hygiene issues to infection. The condition is usually manageable, but for a show cow like Vertigo, it’s unacceptable.

Faster, safer method zaps tumors with great success

June 17, 2014

When Kevin McSweeney was referred to UW Health last year for a tumor in his liver, he had already gone through six rounds of chemotherapy and 13 surgeries over ten years to treat his metastasized cancer.

Junior Cal Melberg becomes ‘the match’

February 12, 2014

After attending a Be the Match bone marrow donor registration event on campus last May, UW–Madison junior Cal Melberg knew his chances of ever being matched were slim. Then, in September, he got the call.

UW-Madison team probes home health environments with virtual reality

October 3, 2013

In health care environments, nurses and doctors can closely monitor patients' medical regimen and schedules. But when a patient leaves the clinic or hospital to go home, the responsibility for care transitions to families and patients. The result: Regimens might not be adhered to as closely.