Stories indexed under: Science

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  • Photo: Jonathan Patz Actions on climate change bring better health, study says Sept. 22, 2014 The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Ultrasound Ultrasound enhancement provides clarity to damaged tendons, ligaments Sept. 19, 2014 Ultrasound is a safe, affordable and noninvasive way to see internal structures, including the developing fetus. Ultrasound can also “see” other soft tissue — including tendons, which attach muscles to bone, and ligaments, which attach bone to bone. Ray Vanderby, a professor of biomedical engineering and orthopedics and rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is commercializing an ultrasound method to analyze the condition of soft tissue.
  • Photo: Amy DeJong and Maya Warren Badger duo experiences an amazing summer on ‘The Amazing Race’ Sept. 19, 2014 Amy DeJong and Maya Warren had a truly epic summer, but they can't tell you about it.
  • Photo: Brandon Barton Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance Sept. 19, 2014 Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air - and the soybeans - were still?
  • Helen Blackwell Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly Sept. 18, 2014 No matter how many times it’s demonstrated, it’s still hard to envision bacteria as social, communicating creatures. But by using a signaling system called “quorum sensing,” these single-celled organisms radically alter their behavior to suit their population. Helen Blackwell, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been making artificial compounds that mimic the natural quorum-sensing signals, including some that block a natural signal from binding to its protein target.
  • Photo: Person in PET scanner Down syndrome helps researchers understand Alzheimer’s disease Sept. 18, 2014 The link between a protein typically associated with Alzheimer's disease and its impact on memory and cognition may not be as clear as once thought, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center. The findings are revealing more information about the earliest stages of the neurodegenerative disease.
  • Mo Fayyaz Campus botany gardener: transplant master Sept. 16, 2014 To hear master gardener Mo Fayyaz tell it, raising plants is straightforward: Get the right light, temperature, soil and water. Keep your eyes open. If one thing doesn’t work, try something else. And if everything fails, choose another plant. “You cannot just plant a rose in the shade and expect much,” he says. In 1984, Fayyaz secured his present job, director of UW-Madison’s Botany Garden and Greenhouse, and he began a long campaign to nurture and expand a garden that supports teaching and research in the biological sciences.
  • Photo: Mark Johnson Journal Sentinel’s Mark Johnson to be Science Writer in Residence Sept. 16, 2014 Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Mark Johnson will bring his experience and expertise to campus as the fall 2014 University of Wisconsin-Madison Science Writer in Residence.
  • Kenneth Cameron Project prepares collection for 21st-century challenge of invasive species Sept. 12, 2014 At the Wisconsin State Herbarium, director Kenneth Cameron is spearheading a new, three-year project to “digitize” images and data on aquatic and wetland plants, mollusks and fish from the Great Lakes basin. The $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation will also be disbursed to natural history museums at UW campuses in Stevens Point, Milwaukee and La Crosse, and in every other Great Lakes state. Together, these institutions expect to digitize 1.73 million specimens related to Great Lakes invasives.
  • Photo: Richard Davidson Yogic breathing shows promise in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder Sept. 11, 2014 One of the greatest casualties of war is its lasting effect on the minds of soldiers. This presents a daunting public health problem: More than 20 percent of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a 2012 report by RAND Corp.
  • Wisconsin Science Festival Wisconsin Science Festival to celebrate scientific discovery, community Sept. 11, 2014 Thousands of visitors, young and old, will have the chance to indulge their “inner scientist” during the 2014 Wisconsin Science Festival, with more than 20 communities statewide joining Madison in the event. Now in its fourth year, the festival will be held from Oct. 16-19.
  • Rat brain cortex Cool Science Image collection debuts at McPherson Eye Research Vision Gallery Sept. 9, 2014 The winning images from the 2014 Cool Science Image (CSI) contest will be on display beginning Sept. 2 at the Mandelbaum & Albert Family Vision Gallery, part of the McPherson Eye Research Institute.
  • Neuron In directing stem cells, study shows context matters Sept. 8, 2014 In a new study, a team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation, showing that the stiffness of the surfaces on which stem cells are grown can exert a profound influence on cell fate.
  • Prototype electric motor New motor under development by UW-Madison spinoff Sept. 8, 2014 A tabletop motor using an entirely new driving principle is under development at the headquarters of C-Motive Technologies, a startup business that is commercializing technology from the College of Engineering at UW-Madison.
  • Physical Sciences Lab PSL: Still making amazing instruments after all these years Sept. 4, 2014 A century ago, physicists used a tabletop “cloud chamber” to explore the motion of otherwise invisible particles. Today, they need giant machines to explore the bizarre frontiers of modern physics. And significant components of the most important modern physics experiments in China, Switzerland, the United States and the South Pole can trace their roots to a lab across the road from a cornfield near Stoughton, Wisconsin — the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Physical Sciences Laboratory, or PSL.
  • Soybean plants A touching story: The ancient conversation between plants, fungi and bacteria Aug. 27, 2014 The mechanical force that a single fungal cell or bacterial colony exerts on a plant cell may seem vanishingly small, but it plays a heavy role in setting up some of the most fundamental symbiotic relationships in biology. In fact, it may not be too much of a stretch to say that plants may have never moved onto land without the ability to respond to the touch of beneficial fungi, according to a new study led by Jean-Michel Ané, a professor of agronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Photo: Section of asphalt resting on two cylindrical samples in lab UW center teams up with five states to address asphalt issues Aug. 22, 2014 More than 80 percent of major roads in the United States are still surfaced with asphaltic mixtures - and the liquid asphalt, a byproduct of oil refining, remains a bit of a chemical mess, an inconsistent, complex mix of hydrocarbons. So to understand how different kinds of asphalt will hold up under the weight of vehicles and the punishment of the elements, road engineers must use physical methods, from ovens to hydraulic testing devices, to inflict stress and extreme temperatures upon the mixtures.
  • UW-Madison chosen for federally funded cloud computing research Aug. 21, 2014 Cloud computing, which allows users of technology to tap into remote, shared infrastructure and services, is a major facet of today’s world. Whether or not we realize it, countless aspects of our daily lives — from social media to drug discovery — are now enabled by cloud computing. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has been chosen to be part of a National Science Foundation-funded project called CloudLab — a joint effort of university and industry teams for the development of cloud infrastructure and fostering the high-level research that it supports.
  • Helping communities prepare for climate change Aug. 21, 2014 Over the last several decades, Wisconsin has seen an increase in extreme weather and variability, and these conditions are likely to become more common in the years ahead. Scientists in the Nelson Institute Center for Climatic Research (CCR) project a sharp rise in average annual temperatures in coming decades – somewhere between 4 and 9 degrees Fahrenheit – spawning more frequent and intense storms, droughts and heat waves. These trends will challenge cities throughout the state.
  • Waclaw Szybalski Legend in genetics at forefront of book about heroism during 20th century's darkest hours Aug. 20, 2014 Waclaw Szybalski, 92, a genius of genetics who has been repeatedly mentioned as a candidate for the Nobel Prize, grew up as an aspiring scientist during World War II in the eastern part of Poland. Many of Szybalski's most significant wartime roles concerned a decidedly applied type of science: He cooked TNT so the Polish resistance could sabotage rail lines. He participated in smuggling typhus vaccine to Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto. And he fed lice and supervised "louse feeders."