Stories indexed under: Science

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  • Photo: Kristina Slawny and Jay Johnson They know the drill: UW leads the league in boring through ice sheets Oct. 30, 2014 Hollow coring drills designed and managed by UW-Madison’s Ice Drilling Design and Operations (IDDO) program are used to extract ice cores that can analyze the past atmosphere. Shaun Marcott, an assistant professor of geoscience at UW-Madison, was the first author of a paper published today in the journal Nature documenting carbon dioxide in the atmosphere between 23,000 and 9,000 years ago, based on data from an 11,000-foot hole in Antarctica.
  • Photo: Astronomy class Report, experts analyze surging STEM activity at UW-Madison Oct. 30, 2014 A recent report on instructional activity in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) disciplines at the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows significant advances in enrollment and degrees since 2000, which campus experts attribute to a number of factors, including job placement, greater career opportunities and enhanced teaching methods.
  • Photo: Swimming leatherback turtle Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals Oct. 29, 2014 For the first time, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Florida Atlantic University (FAU), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.
  • Photo: WISCIENCE WISCIENCE to expand possibilities for science education, outreach Oct. 28, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Institute for Biology Education is announcing its expansion to become the Wisconsin Institute for Science Education and Community Engagement, or WISCIENCE. The new mission extends across the natural sciences and expands responsibility for facilitating cross-campus collaboration and coordination in the areas of science outreach and support for groups underrepresented in science.
  • Photo: PJ Liesch Wisconsin’s new ‘bug guy,’ insect detective arrives on campus Oct. 23, 2014 His favorite insect is one he has actually never seen alive in the wild. It lives on snowfields and glaciers in the American West, aptly named an ice crawler. But PJ Liesch, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s new “bug guy,” continues to search for it. “I’ve been out West looking for them a couple of times and haven’t had any luck, so they’re kind of one I have on my bucket list, just to see one of those out in the wild,” says Liesch. The insect specialist officially took over as manager of the UW-Madison Insect Diagnostic Lab this summer.
  • UW to serve as national hub for mentor training as part of diversity consortium Oct. 22, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison will serve as a national hub for research mentor and mentee training for the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) recently announced by NIH as part of a national Diversity Program Consortium. The NIH will award the Diversity Program Consortium nearly $31 million in fiscal year 2014 funds to develop new approaches that engage researchers, including those from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences, and prepare them to thrive in the NIH-funded workforce.
  • Photo: Clear implantable medical sensor See-through sensors open new window into the brain Oct. 20, 2014 Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain. The team described its technology, which has applications in fields ranging from neuroscience to cardiac care and even contact lenses, in the Oct. 20 issue of the online journal Nature Communications.
  • Photo: Francis Halzen UW physicist receives American Ingenuity Award for IceCube effort Oct. 17, 2014 Francis Halzen, the University of Wisconsin-Madison physicist who was the driving force behind the giant neutrino telescope known as IceCube at the South Pole, has been named a winner of the 2014 American Ingenuity Award.
  • Photo: Trisha Andrew UW-Madison chemist named Packard Fellow Oct. 16, 2014 Trisha Andrew, a University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of chemistry, is one of 18 early career scientists from around the country named a Packard Fellow for Science and Engineering. The award includes a grant of $875,000 over five years to pursue research and is given in recognition of the potential significance of scholarship and innovation from the nation’s most promising young scientists and engineers.
  • Photo: Maria Klawe Newsmaker who called out Microsoft president to speak at UW-Madison Oct. 16, 2014 Last week, when Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella told women in tech fields to wait to be rewarded rather than ask for raises, he was quietly but forcefully challenged by his interviewer, Maria Klawe. The next day, facing a storm of criticism, Nadella backpedaled, saying by email, “Maria’s advice was the right advice. If you think you deserve a raise, you should just ask.” Klawe, president of Harvey Mudd College will speak Friday at Union South about increasing women’s participation in science and technology careers on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.
  • Media Advisory: Newsmaker who called out Microsoft CEO to speak Friday Oct. 15, 2014 Maria Klawe, president of Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California, will discuss ways to increase women's participation in science and technology careers on Friday, Oct. 17.
  • Media Advisory: Coverage opportunities at Wisconsin Science Festival Oct. 14, 2014 This tip sheet highlights key events of the 2014 Wisconsin Science Festival, held Oct. 16-19, and opportunities for coverage. All events below will be in the Discovery Building at 330 N. Orchard St.
  • Photo: Wisconsin Science Festival Highlights start early in four-day Wisconsin Science Festival Oct. 14, 2014 You name it, and the fourth annual Wisconsin Science Festival has it all — dance, star-gazing, fossils, art, museum and stage shows — spread over four days and venues in 25 Wisconsin cities. While the curious of all ages are immersed in hands-on exploration, and visitors marvel at the research underway and specimens on display around campus and the state, several of the festival’s marquee events may be of interest to faculty and staff on campus. The festival runs from Thursday through Sunday, Oct. 16-19.
  • UW to expand research into advanced, economically viable bioproducts Oct. 13, 2014 Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Minnesota and Argonne National Laboratory will explore ways to produce renewable plastic precursors and other substances from biomass with a recently announced $3.3 million grant from the United States Department of Energy.
  • Photo: Henslow’s Sparrow Balancing birds and biofuels: Grasslands support more species than cornfields Oct. 9, 2014 In Wisconsin, bioenergy is for the birds. Really. In a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) scientists examined whether corn and perennial grassland fields in southern Wisconsin could provide both biomass for bioenergy production and bountiful bird habitat. The research team found that where there are grasslands, there are birds. Grass-and-wildflower-dominated fields supported more than three times as many bird species as cornfields, including 10 imperiled species found only in the grasslands.
  • Photo: Lee Wilke Company developing radio frequency technology to localize breast tumors Oct. 9, 2014 Breast cancer may inspire more public discussion, advocacy and charitable giving than almost any other disease besides HIV and AIDS. But people rarely talk about the specific experiences to which cancer patients are subjected.
  • Illustration: ESWN logo New nonprofit supports women in science Oct. 8, 2014 Tracey Holloway was a postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University in 2002, Ph.D. from Princeton University freshly in hand, when she and five colleagues teamed up to create an informal support network for other women in their field.
  • Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka Influenza researcher Yoshihiro Kawaoka wins Breakthrough Award Oct. 7, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka has been recognized as a 2014 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award recipient for his efforts to understand and prevent pandemic influenza.
  • Photo: Pamela Kreeger With NIH New Innovator Award, engineer to study how ovarian cancer spreads Oct. 6, 2014 With approximately 22,000 diagnoses annually in the United States, ovarian cancer isn't among the most commonly occurring cancers. Yet, the mortality rate for women who have ovarian cancer hovers above 60 percent.
  • Alt: Collegiate Inventors Competition Two UW student teams named finalists in national inventors competition Oct. 3, 2014 Two University of Wisconsin-Madison undergraduate teams are among only seven finalists for the 2014 National Collegiate Inventors Competition, which honors the latest in student creativity and innovation.