Stories indexed under: Science

Total: 1577   RSSRSS feed

  • Photo: Trisha Andrew Save power, make power: UW chemist confronts ambitious agenda with a brash laugh Nov. 25, 2014
  • Photo: Melanoplus grasshopper Grasshoppers signal slow recovery of post-agricultural woodlands, study finds Nov. 24, 2014 New research by Philip Hahn and John Orrock at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on the recovery of South Carolina longleaf pine woodlands once used for cropland shows just how long lasting the legacy of agriculture can be in the recovery of natural places. By comparing grasshoppers found at woodland sites once used for agriculture to similar sites never disturbed by farming, Hahn and Orrock show that despite decades of recovery, the numbers and types of species found in each differ.
  • AAAS honors four UW-Madison professors for advancing science Nov. 24, 2014 Four members of the University of Wisconsin–Madison faculty have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the society announced today.
  • Photo: Michael Povlonis Satellite history at UW-Madison comes full circle with award Nov. 21, 2014 Michael Pavolonis thinks of himself as a volcano guy.
  • Photo: A deer wades into a stormwater detention pond at Curtis Prairie in the UW Arboretum. Ecologist/hunter talks deer, plants, hunters and balance Nov. 20, 2014 UW-Madison Professor of Botany Donald Waller is a pioneer in exploring the impact of deer in natural habitats. For more than 20 years, Waller - who counts himself among the state's deer hunters - has led research on the economic, health and environmental impacts of deer, including:
  • Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka Halting the hijacker: Cellular targets to thwart influenza virus infection Nov. 20, 2014 The influenza virus, like all viruses, is a hijacker. It quietly slips its way inside cells, steals the machinery inside to make more copies of itself, and then - having multiplied - bursts out of the cell to find others to infect.
  • Full color 3-D printing takes top prize in Collegiate Inventors Competition Nov. 20, 2014 Innovative 3-D printing technology came out on top as Spectrom - developed by a University of Wisconsin-Madison team that includes Cedric Kovacs-Johnson, Charles Haider and Taylor Fahey - won first place in the undergraduate category of the Collegiate Inventors Competition.
  • Prematurity Awareness Month: Variation among preterm infants is the norm Nov. 19, 2014
  • Crops play a major role in the annual CO2 cycle increase Nov. 19, 2014 In a study published Wednesday, Nov. 19, in Nature, scientists at Boston University, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Michigan, the University of Minnesota, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and McGill University show that a steep rise in the productivity of crops grown for food accounts for as much as 25 percent of the increase in this carbon dioxide (CO2) seasonality.
  • Photo: Barry Van Veen with sensors attached to head Imagination, reality flow in opposite directions in the brain Nov. 19, 2014 As real as that daydream may seem, its path through your brain runs opposite reality. Aiming to discern discrete neural circuits, researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have tracked electrical activity in the brains of people who alternately imagined scenes or watched videos.
  • Photo: Lump of fool's gold Scientists get to the heart of fool's gold as a solar material Nov. 18, 2014 As the installation of photovoltaic solar cells continues to accelerate, scientists are looking for inexpensive materials beyond the traditional silicon that can efficiently convert sunlight into electricity.
  • Photo: Researcher in lab Grad program honored for closing science-society gap Nov. 18, 2014 The University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Neuroscience and Public Policy Program was honored by the Society for Neuroscience with the Neuroscience Graduate Program Achievement Award.
  • Photo: David Vereide Morgridge scientists find way to ‘keep the lights on’ for cell self-renewal Nov. 13, 2014 One remarkable quality of pluripotent stem cells is they are immortal in the lab, able to divide and grow indefinitely under the right conditions. It turns out this ability also may exist further down the development path, with the workhorse progenitor cells responsible for creating specific tissues.
  • Collaboration yields new methods to treat tumors with antennas Nov. 7, 2014 A conversation with a University of Wisconsin-Madison neurosurgeon prompted two engineering researchers to challenge a commonly held idea about tumor ablation, and as a result, they're now working to commercialize a new technology that could yield less invasive radiation therapies for cancer patients.
  • Photo: Bill Provencher New master’s program in energy conservation is first of its kind Nov. 7, 2014 A new professional master's program will launch at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in fall 2015 and become the first in the world specifically designed to train analytically minded students to evaluate energy efficiency and other resource-conservation initiatives.
  • Photo: Astronaut Reid Wiseman injects a fixative solution onto the seedlings. UW team’s plants return to Earth after growing in space Nov. 6, 2014 Researchers at Simon Gilroy's lab in the Department of Botany at the University of Wisconsin-Madison expect to greet a truck this afternoon that is carrying small containers holding more than 1,000 frozen plants that germinated and grew aboard the International Space Station.
  • Photo: Katie Brenner UW-Madison scientist receives award to save babies, a diaper at a time Nov. 6, 2014 She woke up in her hospital room feeling nothing short of desperation. Katie Brenner remembered giving birth to a tiny daughter hours earlier but the doctors and nurses had whisked the preterm infant away for care. She hadn’t seen little Ruthie since. “I want to meet my daughter,” the normally polite Brenner demanded of the hospital staff. Her little girl is now a healthy 6-year-old and for that, Brenner is thankful. But she knows the story ends much differently for too many families. Doing something about it has inspired her scientific career.
  • They know the drill: UW leads the league in boring through ice sheets Oct. 30, 2014 Hollow coring drills designed and managed by UW-Madison’s Ice Drilling Design and Operations (IDDO) program are used to extract ice cores that can analyze the past atmosphere. Shaun Marcott, an assistant professor of geoscience at UW-Madison, was the first author of a paper published today in the journal Nature documenting carbon dioxide in the atmosphere between 23,000 and 9,000 years ago, based on data from an 11,000-foot hole in Antarctica.
  • Astronomy students Report, experts analyze surging STEM activity at UW-Madison Oct. 30, 2014 A recent report on instructional activity in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) disciplines at the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows significant advances in enrollment and degrees since 2000, which campus experts attribute to a number of factors, including job placement, greater career opportunities and enhanced teaching methods.
  • Photo: Swimming leatherback turtle Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals Oct. 29, 2014 For the first time, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Florida Atlantic University (FAU), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.