Tag UW Women at 150

First female valedictorian became renowned suffragist

May 7, 2019

Clara Bewick Colby was among the first class of six women at the University of Wisconsin to graduate with bachelor’s degrees. Later, large crowds would attend her speeches on women’s rights.

Meet ‘The Monarch’

May 6, 2019

The newly unveiled statue, "The Monarch," celebrates the 150th anniversary of women receiving degrees at UW–Madison and was designed by artist Victoria Reed to represent female empowerment and influence.

Gloria Ladson-Billings: Daring to dream in public

April 16, 2019

The renowned scholar, who has helped change the way teachers teach African American children, was the first black woman to become a tenured professor in UW–Madison’s School of Education.

When perseverance is the only option: Mabel Watson Raimey

March 12, 2019

Raimey is believed to have been the first African-American woman to graduate from UW–Madison. And that is just the beginning of her story, as we continue our series UW Women at 150.

UW Women at 150: Computer scientist Thelma Estrin

February 5, 2019

Thelma Estrin was an early pioneer of the field of medical informatics — the now commonplace practice of applying computers to medical research and treatment. She also was something of a trailblazer for women hoping to pursue careers in the sciences.

Ada Deer: A lifetime of firsts

December 18, 2018

Deer, a 1957 graduate, went on to become the first female chair of Wisconsin's Menominee Indian Tribe as well as a national leader in Indian affairs.

Nursing pioneer Signe Skott Cooper: From the farm to the battlefield

November 11, 2018

Cooper devoted more than 60 years to nursing education at UW–Madison and within the UW System. Her wartime service shaped her life, personally and professionally.

UW Women at 150: Looking for — and finding — Lorraine Hansberry

October 30, 2018

While many people know “A Raisin in the Sun,” far fewer know much about its author, Lorraine Hansberry. Hansberry spent less than two years as a student at UW–Madison, but it was an important part of her journey as a writer and activist.