Stories indexed under: Health

Total: 264   RSSRSS feed

  • Photo: TomoTherapy worker installing electrical components Innovative cancer treatment machine: Still made in Wisconsin Sept. 4, 2015 When a promising corporate research contract dries up at your university lab, but the medical equipment you are developing still has potential for treating cancer, what do you do? If you are innovator-entrepreneur Thomas “Rock” Mackie at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the year is 1997, you raise money, create a business, and embark on the long, rocky road of spinoff and commercialization.
  • Photo: Medow holding implant Josh Medow: Critical care for the brain Sept. 3, 2015 At Joshua Medow's first job, in the Neurocritical Intensive Care Unit at UW Hospital and Clinics, he saves lives. His patients have endured strokes, car accidents and shootings.
  • Photo: Ned Kalin Ned Kalin wins Anna-Monika Prize for neuroscience research Sept. 2, 2015 Ned Kalin, chair of psychiatry at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, will receive a major award this week at a conference in Amsterdam for his work in uncovering the signature of anxiety and depression in the brain.
  • Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka Flu study, on hold, yields new vaccine technology Sept. 2, 2015 Vaccines to protect against an avian influenza pandemic as well as seasonal flu may be mass produced more quickly and efficiently using technology described today (Sept. 2) by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the journal Nature Communications.
  • Photo: Discovery Building Morgridge Institute selects Pagliarini to lead campus metabolism initiative Aug. 31, 2015 Dave Pagliarini, a University of Wisconsin-Madison associate professor whose departmental home put metabolism research on the map worldwide, will help define the future of Wisconsin metabolism science as a lead investigator at the Morgridge Institute for Research.
  • ‘Lazy eye’ may bully the brain into altering its wiring Aug. 25, 2015 Colorful and expressive, the eyes are central to the way people interact with each other, as well as take in their surroundings. That makes amblyopia — more commonly known as "lazy eye" — all the more obvious, but the physical manifestation of the most common cause of vision problems among children the world over is actually a brain disorder.
  • Photo: Charles Heise Wireless microcamera clusters broaden laparoscopic imaging Aug. 21, 2015 A revolutionary integrated imaging system under development at the University of Wisconsin-Madison could significantly advance laparoscopy, a minimally invasive surgical procedure that, over the last half century, has seen only incremental improvements in imaging.
  • Report: Bicycling deaths have decreased, but adults remain at elevated risk Aug. 20, 2015 Overall rates for U.S. biking deaths decreased 44 percent from 1975 to 2012, according to a new report published Aug. 14 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and led by Jason Vargo, an assistant scientist with UW-Madison's Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and Global Health Institute.
  • Dietary intervention primes triple-negative breast cancer for targeted therapy July 14, 2015 A diet that starves triple-negative breast cancer cells of an essential nutrient primes the cancer cells to be more easily killed by a targeted antibody treatment, UW Carbone Cancer Center scientists report in a recent publication.
  • Photo: Ronald Raines Cancer discovery links experimental vaccine and biological treatment July 13, 2015 A new study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has linked two seemingly unrelated cancer treatments that are both now being tested in clinical trials.
  • Photo: Students in Fab Lab Gift to Morgridge Institute ‘Fab Lab’ to boost medical device innovations July 8, 2015 A gift to the Morgridge Institute for Research will help spur medical device innovations coming directly from doctors - the people who know firsthand where the advances are needed.
  • Photo: Jill McDermott UW-Madison collaboration promotes well-being in the workplace July 6, 2015 Standing in front of a room of business professionals, Jill McDermott shares a number: two quadrillion - the number of megabytes of information broadcast daily. She pauses to let the audience reflect on how this inundation of information contributes to distractions in the workplace that can chip away at a person's well-being and ability to respond to daily challenges, whether it's giving projects the attention they deserve or shaking off a setback or conflict with a colleague.
  • Photo: Laura Kiessling Protein Suggests a New Strategy to Thwart Infection July 6, 2015 The newfound ability of a protein of the intestines and lungs to distinguish between human cells and the cells of bacterial invaders could underpin new strategies to fight infections.
  • GlovesOn program trains Wisconsin surgeons in latest operating techniques June 12, 2015 An innovative surgical training program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently hosted its 125th participant, making it one of the nation's most active surgical training programs for practicing surgeons - and the only program of its kind in the state.
  • Photo: Fotis Asimakopoulos Navigating multiple myeloma with ‘Google Maps’ for the cancer genome June 8, 2015 In some ways, studying the genetics of cancer has been like examining the individual tiles on a mosaic, says David C. Schwartz, a professor of genetics and chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. To make his point, he brings his face close to the table where he sits - his mosaic for the purpose of illustration - and describes the details of each imaginary tile.
  • Photo: Mark Cook UW-Madison startup offers antibiotic alternative to animal producers June 1, 2015 A University of Wisconsin-Madison animal scientist has developed an antibiotic-free method to protect animals raised for food against common infections.
  • Genetic approaches to cancer, neural development lead to honor for UW-Madison scientists May 21, 2015 Two University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers - one investigating the genetic basis of cancer growth and the other, the role of genes in neural development and learning - have earned funding and a prestigious honor from the Greater Milwaukee Foundation.
  • Brief alcohol screening misses mark for people who most need help, study says May 19, 2015 As screening for alcohol problems during doctor visits has become more mainstream, a new study published in the journal Addiction finds that the technique does not increase successful referrals to alcohol counseling and treatment.
  • Gina Green-Harris Amazing Grace: Singing in chorus helps Alzheimer's patients May 15, 2015 Dementia may have stolen some memories from the Amazing Grace Choir, but it sure hasn't taken their music. The chorus began last year as an outreach project of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute.
  • Longest kidney chain ever completed wraps up at UW Hospital and Clinics April 15, 2015 After living with kidney disease for nearly 30 years, 77-year-old Mitzi Neyens of Wausau, WI, thought her luck had finally run out.