Stories indexed under: Research

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  • Kenneth Cameron Project prepares collection for 21st-century challenge of invasive species Sept. 12, 2014 At the Wisconsin State Herbarium, director Kenneth Cameron is spearheading a new, three-year project to “digitize” images and data on aquatic and wetland plants, mollusks and fish from the Great Lakes basin. The $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation will also be disbursed to natural history museums at UW campuses in Stevens Point, Milwaukee and La Crosse, and in every other Great Lakes state. Together, these institutions expect to digitize 1.73 million specimens related to Great Lakes invasives.
  • Photo: Tour guide with group at GE Healthcare Blank GE Healthcare visit highlights partnerships in Milwaukee area Sept. 12, 2014 Chancellor Rebecca Blank is beginning her second year leading the University of Wisconsin–Madison much as she began her first year – by reaching out across the state to talk about the positive impact the state’s flagship university has throughout Wisconsin.
  • Photo: Richard Davidson Yogic breathing shows promise in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder Sept. 11, 2014 One of the greatest casualties of war is its lasting effect on the minds of soldiers. This presents a daunting public health problem: More than 20 percent of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a 2012 report by RAND Corp.
  • Rebecca Blank Census Bureau Research Data Center to be established at UW–Madison Sept. 9, 2014 The potential for interdisciplinary research is about to expand considerably throughout the state of Wisconsin, thanks to Census Bureau approval for construction of a branch Research Data Center, or RDC, on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus.
  • Neuron In directing stem cells, study shows context matters Sept. 8, 2014 In a new study, a team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation, showing that the stiffness of the surfaces on which stem cells are grown can exert a profound influence on cell fate.
  • Prototype electric motor New motor under development by UW-Madison spinoff Sept. 8, 2014 A tabletop motor using an entirely new driving principle is under development at the headquarters of C-Motive Technologies, a startup business that is commercializing technology from the College of Engineering at UW-Madison.
  • Physical Sciences Lab PSL: Still making amazing instruments after all these years Sept. 4, 2014 A century ago, physicists used a tabletop “cloud chamber” to explore the motion of otherwise invisible particles. Today, they need giant machines to explore the bizarre frontiers of modern physics. And significant components of the most important modern physics experiments in China, Switzerland, the United States and the South Pole can trace their roots to a lab across the road from a cornfield near Stoughton, Wisconsin — the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Physical Sciences Laboratory, or PSL.
  • Sarah Mangelsdorf Campus does anything but cease in the summer Sept. 2, 2014 The University of Wisconsin-Madison is host to boundless opportunities, happenings, changes and more — even when school’s out for the summer. Whether you were around to experience some of the new developments yourself, or taking a break from the everyday bustle of campus life, there was no shortage of activity at the university over the summer.
  • Soybean plants A touching story: The ancient conversation between plants, fungi and bacteria Aug. 27, 2014 The mechanical force that a single fungal cell or bacterial colony exerts on a plant cell may seem vanishingly small, but it plays a heavy role in setting up some of the most fundamental symbiotic relationships in biology. In fact, it may not be too much of a stretch to say that plants may have never moved onto land without the ability to respond to the touch of beneficial fungi, according to a new study led by Jean-Michel Ané, a professor of agronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Research and graduate education transition includes familiar, new faces Aug. 26, 2014 As UW-Madison’s research and graduate education programs begin an historic transition, there will be many familiar faces and a few new ones on the third floor of Bascom Hall.
  • Marsha Mailick Q & A Aug. 26, 2014 Marsha Mailick recently talked with University Communications’ Terry Devitt about the administrative changes to come, the experiences that have prepared her for her new role, and the challenges UW–Madison faces in the areas of research and graduate education.
  • Photo: Marsha Mailick No easy path, Mailick eager to take on one of university’s toughest jobs Aug. 26, 2014 If Marsha Mailick is at all intimidated by the prospect of taking on one of the hardest jobs on the UW-Madison campus, there is no hint of it in her demeanor, as she navigates the familiar territory of Bascom Hall.
  • Photo: Section of asphalt resting on two cylindrical samples in lab UW center teams up with five states to address asphalt issues Aug. 22, 2014 More than 80 percent of major roads in the United States are still surfaced with asphaltic mixtures - and the liquid asphalt, a byproduct of oil refining, remains a bit of a chemical mess, an inconsistent, complex mix of hydrocarbons. So to understand how different kinds of asphalt will hold up under the weight of vehicles and the punishment of the elements, road engineers must use physical methods, from ovens to hydraulic testing devices, to inflict stress and extreme temperatures upon the mixtures.
  • UW-Madison chosen for federally funded cloud computing research Aug. 21, 2014 Cloud computing, which allows users of technology to tap into remote, shared infrastructure and services, is a major facet of today’s world. Whether or not we realize it, countless aspects of our daily lives — from social media to drug discovery — are now enabled by cloud computing. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has been chosen to be part of a National Science Foundation-funded project called CloudLab — a joint effort of university and industry teams for the development of cloud infrastructure and fostering the high-level research that it supports.
  • Helping communities prepare for climate change Aug. 21, 2014 Over the last several decades, Wisconsin has seen an increase in extreme weather and variability, and these conditions are likely to become more common in the years ahead. Scientists in the Nelson Institute Center for Climatic Research (CCR) project a sharp rise in average annual temperatures in coming decades – somewhere between 4 and 9 degrees Fahrenheit – spawning more frequent and intense storms, droughts and heat waves. These trends will challenge cities throughout the state.
  • Photo: Martin Cadwallader at table being interviewed After 13 years, Cadwallader steps down from top research post Aug. 19, 2014 In 1990, when first appointed as an associate dean in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School, geographer Martin Cadwallader had no idea what was over the horizon. Twenty-four years later, after rising through the leadership ranks and serving for 13 years as dean of the Graduate School and vice chancellor for research, Cadwallader prepares to step down from one of the university’s most critical posts. At the end of August he willreturn to the faculty and a cherished role as teacher and scholar.
  • Photo: Volker Radeloff No one-size-fits-all approach in a changing climate, changing land Aug. 18, 2014 As climate change alters habitats for birds and bees and everything in between, so too does the way humans decide to use land. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Aarhus University in Denmark have, for the first time, found a way to determine the potential combined impacts of both climate and land-use change on plants, animals and ecosystems across the country.
  • Photo: foot on coordination-retraining device Grants fund UW technology projects on the road to commercialization Aug. 15, 2014 An exercise machine that helps stroke victims walk. An advanced technology for assessing the progress of prostate cancer. A faster process for making neural stem cells to investigate new treatments for injury and disease. A cheaper, more beautiful LED light bulb. A game to teach meditation. These projects, and a dozen more, are beneficiaries of the first round of awards by the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Discovery to Product, or D2P, program, which began operating in March.
  • Photo: Thomas Givnish New analysis links tree height to climate Aug. 14, 2014 What limits the height of trees? Is it the fraction of their photosynthetic energy they devote to productive new leaves? Or is it their ability to hoist water hundreds of feet into the air, supplying the green, solar-powered sugar factories in those leaves?
  • Research Fall Competition aims to set standard for research excellence Aug. 12, 2014 UW–Madison researchers are being encouraged to apply for competitive funding through the Fall Competition sponsored by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education (VCRGE).