Category Health & Wellness

Doctor’s brainstorm being realized at UW–Madison spinoff

Atrility hopes to market a device that would help in pediatric heart surgery. The design was begun by students in UW–Madison’s department of biomedical engineering.

MR Guidance: Next frontier in hemorrhagic stroke

A UW–Madison startup called InseRT MRI has the goal of guiding drug placements in the brain with MRI, under a license to a patent held by WARF.

A vision for rural eye care

Eye doctors are in short supply in rural Wisconsin, sometimes requiring patients to make a long drive to a distant city for an exam. But the UW Health Teleophthalmology program has a camera that can be used in remote locations to take photos of a person’s eyes, with the exam then being read by university-level ophthalmologists.

Certificate program helps address state’s mental health care needs

The School of Nursing's Psychiatric Mental Health Care Certificate program helps health care providers throughout Wisconsin get certified to prescribe and diagnose in mental health cases.

Baggott named University Health Services executive director

Baggott said the UHS position is “a tremendous leadership opportunity in arguably one of the best programs in the country.”

A pharmacist-driven intervention to help veterans breathe easier

The service led by a UW–Madison pharmacy professor helps veterans who need it most, when they’ve recently been discharged from the hospital or emergency room with an exacerbation, he says.

Program helps address shortage of physicians in rural areas

The program was created due to the shortage of physicians in rural Wisconsin. While 29 percent of Wisconsin residents live in rural locations, only 13 percent of physicians in Wisconsin have rural practices.

Video: Stem cells, lab to clinic

David Gamm, director of the McPherson Eye Research Institute, and Forward Bio Institute director Bill Murphy explain how stem cell scientists at UW–Madison are working with industry to put scientific breakthroughs on the path to helping patients.

UW Women at 150: Computer scientist Thelma Estrin

Thelma Estrin was an early pioneer of the field of medical informatics — the now commonplace practice of applying computers to medical research and treatment. She also was something of a trailblazer for women hoping to pursue careers in the sciences.

Blue “blood” gives residents innovative microsurgery training

To train residents in microsurgery, UW physicians have developed the “blue-blood” chicken thigh simulator. Residents suture blood vessels together in chicken thighs perfused with IV fluid dyed blue.

Waisman’s stem cell research into Down syndrome gives family hope

It’s not a cure for Down syndrome that Dave Witte and Cristina Delgadillo want for their 5-year-old daughter. But they would be happy if stem cell research at the Waisman Center reduces the complications faced by Olivia, who has had two heart surgeries and a stroke.

Stem cells: How we got here, where we’re going

This is the first in a series of four videos about stem cell research at UW–Madison: how it started, what it's achieved, and where it's headed. Catch up on what's happened since James Thomson's prescient prediction that stem cells "will change medicine, period." 

UW surgeon’s book reveals history, missteps, successes of organ transplants

Dr. Josh Mezrich has written a book, “When Death Becomes Life: Notes from a Transplant Surgeon,” that gives an overview of transplant history and lays bare Mezrich’s trepidations and triumphs as a kidney and liver transplant surgeon at UW Hospital.

Gene-editing tool now being used to develop better antibiotics

Jason Peters and colleagues have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.

UW-Madison life-expectancy paper nabs top honor from APHA

Work published by three University of Wisconsin researchers regarding decreasing the gap in life expectancy of the United States population compared to European peers, earned top honors from the American Public Health Association.