Stories indexed under: Health

Total: 256   RSSRSS feed

  • Douglas McNeel Spinoff joins fight against prostate cancer Jan. 14, 2014 A spinoff business launched by a University of Wisconsin-Madison cancer researcher is attempting to harness the human immune system to fight prostate cancer.
  • Michael Fiore Article by UW-Madison expert highlights 50th anniversary of surgeon general's smoking report Jan. 7, 2014 An article co-authored by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Dr. Michael Fiore marking the 50th anniversary of the first U.S. Surgeon General's report on smoking was published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • CALS researchers developing novel treatment for septic shock Dec. 26, 2013 By the time doctors diagnose septic shock, patients often are on a knife’s edge. At that point, for every hour that treatment is delayed, a person’s risk of death rises an alarming six percent.
  • Photo: African children's feet in flip-flops Making a better flip-flop to overcome illiteracy and disease Dec. 13, 2013 In many parts of the world, a good share of the population wears flip-flops. In America, the candy-colored sandals are a ubiquitous herald of summer. In rural Uganda, kids wear them, adult men and moms wear them whether they're bopping around the compound, working in the fields or getting water.
  • Ian Duncan Documentary connects multiple sclerosis, Vikings and Nordic skiing Dec. 12, 2013 Multiple sclerosis (MS), a neurological disease that affects more than 400,000 Americans, attacks the nervous system and causes many symptoms, including difficulty moving. But many who suffer from the disease defy its effects by maintaining an active lifestyle.
  • Photo: Jamie Hanson Poverty influences children’s early brain development Dec. 11, 2013 Poverty may have direct implications for important, early steps in the development of the brain, saddling children of low-income families with slower rates of growth in two key brain structures, according to researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
  • Tip: The 12 days of experts Dec. 11, 2013 For many, the holiday season brings joy, fun and cookies. Lots of cookies.
  • Richard J.  Davidson Study reveals gene expression changes with meditation Dec. 4, 2013 With evidence growing that meditation can have beneficial health effects, scientists have sought to understand how these practices physically affect the body.
  • Researchers discover early step in blood stem cell development Dec. 2, 2013 University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) researchers have discovered a very early regulatory event that controls the production of blood stem cells and the adult blood system.
  • UW-Madison professor tells Senate panel health isn't all about health care Nov. 21, 2013 Americans are less healthy than they could be and dying earlier than they should, a UW School of Medicine and Public Health professor emeritus told a committee of the U.S. Senate Wednesday.
  • Photo: Martin Zanni New look identifies crucial clumping of diabetes-causing proteins Nov. 11, 2013 People get type 2 diabetes. So do cats. But rats don’t, and neither do dogs. Subtle differences in the shape of proteins protect some and endanger others.
  • Photo: Zhijie Wang Discovery sheds light on how changes in lungs can hurt the heart Nov. 8, 2013 A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has discovered important biomechanical changes in human arteries that could increase understanding of how pulmonary hypertension leads to heart failure.
  • WARF Innovation Award winners offer a better oat, infection disrupter Oct. 18, 2013 A new oat offering tasty ways to lower cholesterol and compounds capable of disrupting serious bacterial infections earned top honors in this year's Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Innovation Awards program.
  • Photo: yeast cells Zinc discovery may shed light on Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Sept. 30, 2013 Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have made a discovery that, if replicated in humans, suggests a shortage of zinc may contribute to diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, which have been linked to defective proteins clumping together in the brain.
  • Photo: John Hawks John Hawks explores how celiac disease evolved Sept. 25, 2013 Celiac disease is an evolutionary paradox, says University of Wisconsin-Madison anthropologist John Hawks.
  • Graphic: Transform Wisconsin logo Statewide poll demonstrates overwhelming support for healthy choices Sept. 16, 2013 Transform Wisconsin today released findings of a statewide public opinion poll on attitudes toward healthy living and disease prevention. The survey of 600 likely voters in Wisconsin was conducted from Aug. 1-3 by Public Opinion Strategies.
  • Microbiome and human health workshop Aug. 29, 2013 The opportunity to couple this emerging field and a traditional strength of UW–Madison — large longitudinal studies such as the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study; the Beaver Dam Eye Study; MIDUS, Midlife in the United States; and the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort — will be explored in a small, one-day workshop to be sponsored by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging and the Center for Demography and Ecology.
  • UW Health and VA will work together to improve veterans' health Aug. 28, 2013 The UW program will receive $1.9 million from the VA to participate in a project called Sustainable Engaged Relationships for Veterans Integrative Clinical Education (SERVICE) to work with clinicians in the VA on how to change the way they practice medicine from a focus on disease to a focus on the whole health of the veteran.
  • Photo: researchers tasting drinks Tasty Solution: Better beverages for people who have trouble swallowing Aug. 23, 2013 After having a stroke in 2008, Jan Blume lost the ability to swallow for two full years. As she slowly regained that vital function, she faced a new challenge: drinking the thickened beverages that are recommended for people with swallowing problems, or dysphagia. She found the drinks almost intolerable.
  • Tuberculosis genomes portray secrets of pathogen’s success Aug. 21, 2013 By any measure, tuberculosis (TB) is a wildly successful pathogen. It infects as many as two billion people in every corner of the world, with a new infection of a human host estimated to occur every second.