UW-Madison in the Media

A selection of media coverage about the university and its people.

  • UW biofeedback program helps children with incontinence Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Sept. 1, 2015 There are different ways to measure how well children with incontinence are doing in overcoming the condition.
  • Google Says It’s Not the Driverless Car’s Fault. It’s Other Drivers’. New York Times Sept. 1, 2015 Quoted: The way humans often deal with these situations is that “they make eye contact. On the fly, they make agreements about who has the right of way,” said John Lee, a professor of industrial and systems engineering and expert in driver safety and automation at the University of Wisconsin.
  • Mielke: Research using fetal tissue saves lives Appleton Post-Crescent Aug. 31, 2015 I will never forget the day, now 65 years ago, when my teammate on the Appleton High School basketball team was allowed to dribble the ball down the court and make a scoring shot.
  • UW-Madison move-in days to bring heavy traffic, street closures Wisconsin State Journal Aug. 25, 2015 The big move-in days will be this coming Thursday, Sunday and Monday, according to UW-Madison. Traffic around all residence halls will be extremely heavy on those days, the university said in a press release. Students can begin moving in on those days any time after 8 a.m. on their assigned day.
  • Nearly 700 UW-Madison faculty sign letter on fetal tissue bill Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Aug. 26, 2015 Nearly 700 University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty members have signed a letter to the editor of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel arguing that a bill being considered by the Legislature to ban the use of fetal tissue and cells would not only close off avenues of hope for patients, it would send a message to biomedical scientists and the biotechnology industry "that Wisconsin is no place to do business."
  • Deep beneath Antarctica's ice, signs of bizarre cosmic particles Christian Science Monitor Aug. 24, 2015 Buried deep in the Antarctic ice, an observatory has spotted ghostly, nearly massless particles coming from inside our galaxy and points beyond the Milky Way.
  • ‘Little Free Library’ inspires neighborhoods to read Springfield News-Leader Aug. 24, 2015 At first glance, it often looks like a giant birdhouse on a post in someone’s yard.But upon closer examination, you will notice it’s a miniature library and it’s stocked with books. Children’s books, self-help books, novels, historical features — a variety of reads for a variety of ages.
  • Researchers test alternative to livestock antibiotics — eggs Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Aug. 18, 2015 The chickens weren't getting sick like they were supposed to.
  • How the University of Wisconsin is closing the data science skills gap CIO Aug. 19, 2015 When the University of Wisconsin asked businesses what they were looking for in employees, nearly all of them said, ‘data scientists.’ The university responded with an online data science master degree program to help bring more qualified data professionals to the job market..
  • UPDATE: Key Senate Republican opposes major portion of fetal tissue ban bill WKOW TV Aug. 13, 2015 A key Senate Republican told 27 News Wednesday that she cannot support the current version of an Assembly bill designed to ban the sale and use of aborted fetal tissue, because it would stop major medical research being conducted at UW-Madison. Sen. Alberta Darling (R-RIver Hills) made those comments just one day after the Assembly Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety held a public hearing on the bill.
  • The Science Of Mindfulness Wisconsin Public Radio Aug. 13, 2015 Interviewed: Richard Davidson, one of the world’s leading neuroscientists for a look at how the practice of mindfulness affects the brain.
  • Fetal tissue ban would halt life-saving research, officials warn Assembly panel Wisconsin State Journal Aug. 12, 2015 Planned Parenthood and other groups could not profit from selling the tissue of aborted fetuses under a bill banning its sale and use, proponents of the measure told a state Assembly panel Tuesday.
  • On Campus: Scientists work to improve solar power; UW agencies join Snapchat Madison.com Aug. 11, 2015 A research team led by a UW-Madison professor has received $2.6 million from the U.S. Department of Energy to improve solar power technology and make the alternative energy source more competitive with fossil fuels. Also: UW Police, Athletics join Snapchat.
  • Fetal tissue bill imperils medical breakthroughs, researchers warn Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Aug. 10, 2015 In the late 1990s, Gail Robertson, a researcher studying irregular heartbeats at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, discovered the reason for unexplained cardiac deaths occurring in some patients who had used approved drugs.
  • Used responsibly, fetal tissue has led to medical advances Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Aug. 10, 2015 Noted: Authored by John R. Raymond, Sr., M.D., president and chief executive officer and professor of medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Robert N. Golden, M.D., dean of the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, the Robert Turell Professor in Medical Leadership and vice chancellor for medical affairs.
  • Fastest ever neutrino among slew of fresh findings BBC News Aug. 10, 2015 Noted: "It was made by a neutrino that came through the Earth somewhere below our detector," said IceCube’s principal investigator Francis Halzen, of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Bee happy: UW researchers help growers improve pollinator habitats Milwaukee Journal Sentinel July 30, 2015 University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists are researching which habitats encourage native bumblebees to forage in fields and thrive, and honeybee population declines have driven up the costs of renting nonnative bees for pollination. Quoted: Jeremy Hemberger, graduate student in entomology.
  • A Renaissance painting reveals how breeding changed watermelons Vox July 29, 2015 Quoted: James Nienhuis, a horticulture professor at the University of Wisconsin, uses the Stanchi painting in his classes to teach about the history of crop breeding.
  • UW-Madison, two-year campuses to increase associate degree holders Milwaukee Journal Sentinel July 29, 2015 A unique agreement between the state's flagship university, its public two-year colleges and a Madison technical college aims to increase the number of residents who hold at least an associate degree. The new "reverse transfer" agreement will allow students who transfer to the flagship before completing an associate degree to complete the requirements and pick up that degree while also working toward a bachelor's degree.
  • UW researchers break ground with Alzheimer’s study Isthmus July 27, 2015 Jeanne Bristol and Kay Cronin remember their dad as a proud man who worked hard to get ahead. “He put himself through college in his 50s,” Kay says. “It was important to him.”
  • Badger football team helps build house Channel3000.com July 27, 2015 (Video) 91 Wisconsin Badger football players helped build frames for walls for a house for Habitat For Humanity Friday.
  • Pixar's 'Inside Out' Reminds Us to Manage Emotions by Training Our Brain Huffington Post July 24, 2015 If you could look at your own personality, which emotion leads others in managing your mind’s control room? Joy? Fear? Disgust? Anger? Sadness?Through the lens of the new Pixar movie "Inside Out", Joy calls the shots in the mind of the 11-year-old protagonist named Riley. In fact, this positive emotion -- personified by actress Amy Poehler -- finds it hard to step aside when other emotions are in many ways more appropriate for the situations Riley finds herself in, including moving to a new city and navigating school and friends.
  • Using child's play to teach mathematics is focus of conference Capital Times July 23, 2015 Math knowledge is a better predictor of academic success than literacy, but high quality early instruction is key, says UW-Madison professor Beth Graue.
  • UW-Madison is 25th best in world in new rankings Milwaukee Journal Sentinel July 21, 2015 The University of Wisconsin-Madison for the second year in a row ranked 25th in the world in the new Center for World University Rankings.
  • Brain Scans Reveal How Poverty Hurts Children's Brains Bloomberg Business July 21, 2015 Growing up poor has long been linked to lower academic test scores. And there’s now mounting evidence that it’s partly because kids can suffer real physical consequences from low family incomes, including brains that are less equipped to learn.
  • UW-Madison researchers invent a metal-free fuel cell Engadget July 17, 2015 The development of fuel cell technology has been hamstrung by the need for expensive and difficult-to-manufacture catalysts like platinum, rhodium or palladium. But a team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison believe they’ve found an ingenious alternative that employs a molecular, rather than solid, catalyst.
  • Pevehouse & Powers: Do Americans think strategically when they think about trade? Washington Post July 16, 2015 A key talking point in the Obama Administration’s efforts to convince Congress and the public to support the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)—a proposed trade and investment treaty between the U.S. and 12 nations in the Asia Pacific region, now being negotiated—is that the U.S. needs to “write the rules” of trade in the Asia Pacific region before China does. Obama warned in a recent interview with the Wall Street Journal that China would be able to “muscle other countries in the region around rules that disadvantage us” if the United States fails to participate in the TPP.
  • Boy, 11, killed in bike crash was budding jazz pianist, loved current events Madison.com July 15, 2015 Matthew Court was killed while biking to daily swim team practice. His father, Ricardo Court, is director of undergraduate studies for the political science department at UW-Madison. His wife and Matthew’s mother, Kristin Phillips-Court, is an associate professor of French and Italian at the university.
  • UW-Madison's Games Learning Society conference explores gaming in the classroom Capital Times July 13, 2015 With the technology boom over the past decade, more teachers across the nation are taking a digital approach to their lesson plans. At this week’s 11th annual gaming conference hosted by the UW’s Games+Learning+Society department, participants were able to take a look at how games are used as a teaching tool.
  • UW study: women-owned businesses provide growth opportunities for Wisconsin Milwaukee Business Journal July 9, 2015 <p class="content__segment">A <a class="saveLink" href="http://www.bizjournals.com/profiles/company/us/wi/madison/university_of_wisconsin-madison/3230589">University of Wisconsin-Madison</a> study has found that increasing the amount of women-owned businesses in Wisconsin could be an economic growth and development opportunity.</p> <p class="content__segment">As of 2011 in Wisconsin, women owned or managed more than 80,000 businesses, employed over 550,000 workers and earned $45 billion in sales, according to the study's authors, <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/search/results?q=Tessa%20Conroy">Tessa Conroy</a> and <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/search/results?q=Steven%20Deller">Steven Deller</a>. However, there is a significant lack of women-owned businesses in Wisconsin compared with those owned by men.</p>