Stories indexed under: Chemistry

Total: 106   RSSRSS feed

  • Photo: Solar textile Solar textile collaboration weaves chemistry and design July 29, 2015 A new faculty member at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Marianne Fairbanks is bringing decades of experience with dyes, fibers and design to the development of a technology she's been dreaming of for years: the solar textile.
  • Cages offer new direction in sustainable catalyst design July 23, 2015 University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have developed a new approach to structuring the catalysts used in essential reactions in the chemical and energy fields. The advance offers a pathway for industries to wean themselves off of platinum, one of the scarcest metals in the earth's crust.
  • Photo: James Gerken Molecular fuel cell catalysts hold promise for efficient energy storage July 15, 2015 In the quest for better, less expensive ways to store and use energy, platinum and other precious metals play an important role. They serve as catalysts to propel the most efficient fuel cells, but they are costly and rare.
  • Photo: Professor Bassam Z. Shakhashiri University Summer Forums invite community members to study chemistry, Chinese painting May 7, 2015 The University of Wisconsin-Madison opens its doors to the community with the annual University Summer Forums from June through August. Offered free to the public, these four-week academic courses feature leading UW-Madison professors in an engaging classroom setting.
  • Photo: Chemical phase map Better battery imaging paves way for renewable energy future April 20, 2015 In a move that could improve the energy storage of everything from portable electronics to electric microgrids, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Brookhaven National Laboratory researchers have developed a novel X-ray imaging technique to visualize and study the electrochemical reactions in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries containing a new type of material, iron fluoride.
  • Photo: Song Jin Solution-grown nanowires make the best lasers April 13, 2015 Take a material that is a focus of interest in the quest for advanced solar cells. Discover a "freshman chemistry level" technique for growing that material into high-efficiency, ultra-small lasers. The result, disclosed today [Monday, April 13] in Nature Materials, is a shortcut to lasers that are extremely efficient and able to create many colors of light.
  • Researchers develop new approach that combines biomass conversion, solar energy conversion March 10, 2015 In a study published March 9 in Nature Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison chemistry Professor Kyoung-Shin Choi presents a new approach to combine solar energy conversion and biomass conversion, two important research areas for renewable energy.
  • Illustration: “Atomic Size Matters” comic book No joke: Chemistry thesis transmuted into comic book Jan. 28, 2015 As thesis writing approached, University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate student Veronica Berns faced a conundrum. She knew how hard it was to describe her work to friends and family — indeed, anybody outside the tight clan of structural chemists. And that was particularly true since she concentrated on a category of should-be-impossible structures called “quasicrystals.” However, Berns liked drawing and using “normal, English-language words,” and so about a year before graduation, she opted to accompany her traditional Ph.D. thesis with a comic book version.
  • Photo: Sam Gellman Chemical dial controls attraction between water-repelling molecules Jan. 14, 2015 Abbott, Gellman and a group of University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have provided new insights on hydrophobic interactions within complex systems. In a study published today in the journal Nature, the researchers show how the nearby presence of polar (water-attracted, or hydrophilic) substances can change the way the nonpolar hydrophobic groups want to stick to each other.
  • Photo: Ph.D. student Sarah Guillot conducts research on new battery materials UW grant program seeds promising ideas, like safer batteries Jan. 8, 2015 State Economic Engagement & Development (SEED) grants are administered by the Office of Industrial Partnerships to support research that interests a researcher and a spinoff he or she founded. During fiscal year 2015, its first year, SEED started disbursing $700,000 to five laboratories. The next round of grants is budgeted at $625,000, and applications are due Feb. 15.
  • Photo: Trisha Andrew Save power, make power: UW chemist confronts ambitious agenda with a brash laugh Nov. 25, 2014
  • Photo: Lump of fool's gold Scientists get to the heart of fool's gold as a solar material Nov. 18, 2014 As the installation of photovoltaic solar cells continues to accelerate, scientists are looking for inexpensive materials beyond the traditional silicon that can efficiently convert sunlight into electricity.
  • Photo: Shannon Stahl New process transforms wood, crop waste into valuable chemicals Nov. 3, 2014 Scientists today disclosed a new method to convert lignin, a biomass waste product, into simple chemicals. The innovation is an important step toward replacing petroleum-based fuels and chemicals with biorenewable materials, says Shannon Stahl, an expert in "green chemistry" at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Photo: Shannon Stahl Professor honored for green chemistry research Oct. 20, 2014 University of Wisconsin-Madison chemistry professor Shannon Stahl is one of five scientists nationwide to receive a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in recognition of his research on using oxygen from the air in chemical reactions.
  • Photo: Trisha Andrew UW-Madison chemist named Packard Fellow Oct. 16, 2014 Trisha Andrew, a University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of chemistry, is one of 18 early career scientists from around the country named a Packard Fellow for Science and Engineering. The award includes a grant of $875,000 over five years to pursue research and is given in recognition of the potential significance of scholarship and innovation from the nation’s most promising young scientists and engineers.
  • Sigma-Aldrich employees partner with SCIENCountErs program Oct. 2, 2014 To provide more opportunities for young people to engage in science, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) and Institute for Chemical Education (ICE) have partnered on a wide range of science outreach programs. The effort was recently bolstered by a new three-year partnership with Sigma-Aldrich, a global life sciences and technology company based out of St. Louis, Missouri, with facilities in Madison and Milwaukee.
  • Helen Blackwell Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly Sept. 18, 2014 No matter how many times it’s demonstrated, it’s still hard to envision bacteria as social, communicating creatures. But by using a signaling system called “quorum sensing,” these single-celled organisms radically alter their behavior to suit their population. Helen Blackwell, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been making artificial compounds that mimic the natural quorum-sensing signals, including some that block a natural signal from binding to its protein target.
  • Neuron In directing stem cells, study shows context matters Sept. 8, 2014 In a new study, a team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation, showing that the stiffness of the surfaces on which stem cells are grown can exert a profound influence on cell fate.
  • Manos Mavrikakis Water’s reaction with metal oxides opens doors for researchers Aug. 8, 2014 A multi-institutional team has resolved a long-unanswered question about how two of the world’s most common substances interact. In a paper published recently in the journal Nature Communications, Manos Mavrikakis, professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his collaborators report fundamental discoveries about how water reacts with metal oxides
  • Photo: Shakhashiri fireworks demonstration ‘Science is fun’ offers traditional July Fourth show July 1, 2014 Chemist and stage master Bassam Shakhashiri will present “Science and Fireworks: Sights and Sounds for Independence Day,” on the Memorial Union Terrace July 4.